Archive | Uncategorized RSS feed for this section

Bundled Up With Friends

25 Apr

I’ve got a lot of ties to the current e-book bundle at Story Bundle (which you really should have bought by now). I’ve already talked about my relationship with Darusha Wehm – whose book I edited and whom I first met in person in London, England at World Sf Convention after her book came out. We’ve seen each other in person a few other times but most of our contact is by e-mail or social media.

I also described my relationship to the other writers in the fabulous anthology Strangers Among Us. Some I’ve known some for a couple of years and others for a couple of decades (Edward Willett sang at my wedding). Most I see once or thrice a year at conventions or other literary and social events while maintaining contact through Facebook and the like. The same can be said for a couple of the other writers in the bundle.

The exception is Robert Sawyer whose Factoring Humanity was a Hugo Award finalist and who is one of only 3 writers I have read everything they ever published. So I was a big fan of his before I first invited him to teach at the Imaginative Fiction Writers Association workshop in 1995. We’ve since been fast friends and spend time together whenever we can. We’ve even dedicated books to each other.

But I want to emphasize that I was a fan of his work before I ever met him – and I remain a fan to this day and consider myself fortunate to also be a friend.

Factoring Humanity is a great book and like all Rob’s books delves deep into the human condition and asks profound questions about the impact of technology on society and individuals. This book has it all: messages from outer space, AI, neuroscience and a rollicking good story. If you haven’t read it, it would be worth buying the bundle just for that.

But wait, there’s more. Factoring Humanity is bundled up with 11 other books which you can get for as little as $15US.

What are you waiting for?

Story Bundle!

12 Apr

Here is a guest blog from Cat Rambo, describing the SFWA Story Bundle including Children of Arkadia by M. Darusha Wehm.

THE SFWA SCIENCE FICTION BUNDLE

The SFWA Science Fiction Bundle – Curated by Cat Rambo

I am so pleased to present the first ever SFWA-focused StoryBundle. The idea for it has been hovering in my head for a several years but it was only last year that we finally had the contacts and volunteer structure to actually enact it. Last year I asked SFWA members to send in their science fiction and fantasy works for consideration in the bundles, and the enthusiastic response to that call let me assemble this awesome bundle as well as a second one, this time with a fantasy focus, for later this year. Midway through this year, we’ll open up the call for applications for the 2018 bundles.

If you’re curious about other SFWA offerings, sign up for our quarterly newsletter, which features new and backlist releases from our members in the area of fiction, games, and other offerings.

One reason I’ve pushed this StoryBundle along is because it’s a program that works well for our small press and independently published members, whose market agility allows them to make full use of the bundle. The membership voted to accept these new members in 2015 and one of the challenges was making sure SFWA served their needs. They’ve added immense enthusiasm and knowledge to our hive mind, and it’s great to have a way that helps them promote their work while also supporting the organization’s Givers Fund, which gives grants each year to encourage and promote fantasy and science fiction writing, including organizations such as the the African Speculative Fiction Society, Alpha Workshop, Clarion and Clarion West, and Launchpad.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, it’s over 50 years old, and has a membership of professional writers and publishing professionals from around the globe. It administers the Nebula Awards each year. If you’re in the Pittsburgh area, stop by the mass autographing session on the evening of May 19, which will feature (literally) dozens of authors, including many authors on this year’s ballot and SFWA’s latest Grand Master, Jane Yolen. Check out the SFWA website at sfwa.org for information on genre writing, the field, and other services. – Cat Rambo

The initial titles in the SFWA Science Fiction Bundle (minimum $5 to purchase) are:

  • Saiensu Fikushon 2016 by TOBI Hirotaka, Toh Enjoe and Taiyo Fujii
  • Borrowed Tides by Paul Levinson
  • The Weave by Nancy Jane Moore
  • Truck Stop Earth by Michael A. Armstrong
  • Children of Arkadia by M. Darusha Wehm
  • Beyond the Gates by Catherine Wells

If you pay more than the bonus price of just $15, you get all six of the regular titles, plus SIX more!

  • Unidentified Funny Objects by Alex Shvartsman
  • Factoring Humanity by Robert J. Sawyer
  • Strangers Among Us by Susan Forest and Lucas K. Law
  • Tech Heaven by Linda Nagata
  • The Burning Eye by John F. Carr
  • The Leaves of October by Don Sakers

This bundle is available only for a limited time via http://www.storybundle.com. It allows easy reading on computers, smartphones, and tablets as well as Kindle and other ereaders via file transfer, email, and other methods. You get multiple DRM-free formats (.epub and .mobi) for all books!

It’s also super easy to give the gift of reading with StoryBundle, thanks to our gift cards – which allow you to send someone a code that they can redeem for any future StoryBundle bundle – and timed delivery, which allows you to control exactly when your recipient will get the gift of StoryBundle.

Why StoryBundle? Here are just a few benefits StoryBundle provides.

  • Get quality reads: We’ve chosen works from excellent authors to bundle together in one convenient package.
  • Pay what you want (minimum $5): You decide how much these fantastic books are worth. If you can only spare a little, that’s fine! You’ll still get access to a batch of exceptional titles.
  • Support authors who support DRM-free books: StoryBundle is a platform for authors to get exposure for their works, both for the titles featured in the bundle and for the rest of their catalog. Supporting authors who let you read their books on any device you want—restriction free—will show everyone there’s nothing wrong with ditching DRM.
  • Give to worthy causes: Bundle buyers have a chance to donate a portion of their proceeds to The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America!
  • Receive extra books: If you beat the bonus price, you’ll get the bonus books!

StoryBundle was created to give a platform for independent authors to showcase their work, and a source of quality titles for thirsty readers. StoryBundle works with authors to create bundles of ebooks that can be purchased by readers at their desired price. Before starting StoryBundle, Founder Jason Chen covered technology and software as an editor for Gizmodo.com and Lifehacker.com.

For more information, visit our website at storybundle.com, tweet us at @storybundle and like us on Facebook.

 

Personal Journeys in the Book Business

28 Aug

It’s been a while but I’ve been busy — publishing three novels and putting together a new anthology. Lazarus Risen is due back from the printers next week and, in the lull, I thought I’d bring you up to date.

Distribution

I recently ended my relationship with my distribution company. That may seem like a crazy thing to do but actually the decision was pretty easy. It all came down to money.

Selling books is hard; selling anything is hard but books are harder because it is the only product that stores can return for a full refund. This practice started in the 1930s when publishers were looking for a way to kick start book sales in the depression. The mass market paperback was relatively new and was designed to be printed cheap and distributed widely. To encourage book sellers – a notoriously conservative lot – to take the risk on unknown writers, the books could be returned for a credit against future sales.

This worked pretty well for publishers, who in those days mostly distributed their own books. They didn’t actually have to give money back – they simply took a loss in the future, which as any economist will tell you, is a discounted loss.

It doesn’t quite work that way anymore. As the world became more complex, sales processes became more specialized. Publishers outsourced their warehouses to distribution companies. Gradually those distribution companies developed their own salesforces (on top of the marketing departments of big publishers) and took over marketing for medium and small publishers.

And of course they took their cut of the sales – which would be okay if they also didn’t charge fees for every transaction they undertake. There is a fee when they send the book to the store and another larger fee for when it comes back. And if the books stop moving, they charge you a fee for storing them and a different fee to dispose of them or return them to the publisher.

Generally you are told you should budget 30% for returns, though the distributor assures you they will do everything possible to keep it below that. But what if they sell your books to the wrong stores – such as stores that don’t sell a lot of science fiction, or stores who won’t keep new or relatively unknown books on their shelves for more than a few weeks? Returns can quickly rise above 30% and, with all the associated fees, it is possible to actually lose money through distribution.

Which is what happened.

I could see that it was coming and I have thought of an alternative – two, in fact. One would be to find a new distributor. There are several out there but getting them to take you on is not as simple as asking. You need to have a certain size back catalog, you need to publish a minimum number of titles each year, you need a certain size print run.

Requirements vary, of course, but obviously, the bigger the distributor (access to more stores, larger sales force, and so on), the stiffer the entry requirements. And returns are still a problem. Still, I’m looking into the possibilities.

Not all distribution companies are created equally and some are as hard to work with for store-owners as they are for publishers. Complex accounting processes and inefficient shipping practices can lead stores to refuse to work with certain distribution companies.

I’ve talked to a few book sellers about the problem and they either suggested a smaller, but reliable, mostly Canadian firm (there are several) or to do self-distribution. If authors can self-publish, why can’t publishers self-distribute?

So, for at least the interim, that’s what I’m going to do. I’ve created a catalog that includes all the backlist (and announces the titles of upcoming publications) and I’ve started sending it out.

My first experience was a good one. A few weeks ago at When Words Collide (which was a great success – we won an Aurora Award and had a successful triple book launch), I approached a couple of regular book sellers with the catalog. One took the catalog and the other took some books. So while supplies last, Calgary readers can buy Bundoran Books from the Sentry Box. I’m hoping to add a lot of names to that list in the coming weeks.

The secret – deep discounts for the book sellers (more than the traditional 40%) and no returns for the publisher. Even with shipping costs I expect to make more money than I did with my big American distributor. And I certainly won’t lose money. Obviously this approach is unlikely to work with the big chain bookstores and it definitely won’t work on Amazon – but it might actually result in more books sold which will be good for both me and for the authors I publish.

E-books

Like most traditional publishers, I publish e-books of all the books I also publish by print. I’ve even published one stand-alone novella. Some have sold okay – mostly when both I and the author independently promote them – but none have been spectacular. The only exception is my anthology, Blood and Water, which sold a lot of copies by being included in a book bundle with nine other Aurora-winning or nominated books.

I’ve done all the usual things to promote e-book (and print sales): Twitter, Facebook, (including ads), Goodreads, blogs, manipulating the Amazon algorithm, but the results have been so-so..

But then there was Stars Like Cold Fire by Brent Nichols, which in the last two weeks has sold more units than all the other titles (except for the aforementioned Blood and Water) sold in the last six months. How did this happen? Neither of us have a clue. It’s not like it has become a best seller in its category (Space Opera) – although apparently that doesn’t mean what you might think anyway – but it has ticked along very nicely. Neither Brent nor I are likely to get rich – but you never know. Maybe a year from now, we’ll be referring to Brent as the new Hugh Howey. And I’ll have sold my company to Random House.

Speaking of e-books, the debate continues to rage over which is doing better – e-books or print books. Some would have you believe that e-books are in decline and print books are on the rise and sales figures would suggest they are right. Total e-book sales have fallen since 2013, while print books have shown a modest but steady increase.

Others would point out that e-book weakness is largely because there wasn’t a breakout YA novel in 2014 or 2015 – which shows how a single author like J.K.Rowling can move the market more than 10,000 other lesser selling authors. And at the same time, the rise in print sales is almost entirely due to the recent fade of adult colouring books.

That’s right. Colouring books. Maybe I need to produce a book of colour-it-yourself space ships and alien landscapes.

My own view is that – publishing is a tough business and few people are going to make a decent living at it. Most people who make a living as a writer start out being supported by family, friends, spouses, and lousy part-time jobs. Or if they live in a country that values the arts – by public arts granting agencies. For Canadians, things recently got a little better – but it’s still a rough go. Here are the median individual incomes in Canada. If you are doing better than that as a writer – count yourself lucky.

Still, we persevere – both as writers and as publishers. After all what else can we do?

Yeah, I know, get a haircut and get a real job

 

2014 in review

30 Dec

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,200 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 37 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Right to Know by Edward Willett

29 Jul

Here is a short excerpt from the beginning of Right to Know. Read a review of the book at SFRevu.

 

Chapter One

Rick’s Place was crowded when Art stepped through the door, Treena on his arm. But then, everything was crowded in Habitat Twenty: the apartments stacked from deck to skyplate, the four levels of tubewalks, and even the central park, consisting of little more than a few hundred square metres of scraggly grass and a fountain that hadn’t worked in fifteen years. The only thing the habitat had going for it was the beer in Rick’s Place—best beer on the ship, Art was convinced—and Treena, the busty blonde who’d contacted him earlier that day out of the blue with the provocative news that her name had come up in the Conception Draft, that his name was on the list of approved fathers, and that she much preferred to fulfill her reproductive duties through old-fashioned rather than technological means.

 Art was more than willing, and had arranged to meet her. Now they threaded their way through the crowd, nobody paying them any attention. It was another reason he liked Rick’s Place. He’d been going there often enough he was seen as a regular. Nobody cared that every evening his face was plastered on screens all over the ship, reading the shipday’s news. In the mid-Habs and higher there were fancier places where he would have been treated as a celebrity. That could be nice, but sometimes he just wanted to be an ordinary guy interested in ordinary things…like beer. And Treena.

A table had just opened up in the corner; he steered Treena to it. “I’ll get us some drinks,” he said to her, and she smiled. Her nose crinkled adorably and her chest heaved in an interesting fashion, and although her blue eyes were rather vacant, they were certainly pretty. Art smiled back and turned to pick his way to the bar.

 “Rick”—Art had never known if that was his real name or not—had just put a pint of red ale and a fizzy pink cocktail on the bar when Art’s arm was suddenly seized in an iron-like grip and twisted behind him. He gasped in pain as he was frog-marched through the crowd, which scattered in front of him. His unseen assailant smashed him up against the faux-wood wall, right between the dartboards, and growled in his ear, “You’ve got your nerve coming here.”

 The words were carried on a puff of hot breath smelling of fresh beer and old garlic. “Who—” Art began, but got no farther before he was spun around and squeezed up against the wall by a massive arm across his chest, so tightly he could hardly breathe. He blinked at the face just inches from his own. “Pete?” he wheezed.

 His best friend from childhood glowered at him. “This is a place for Shipborn, Stoddard. Shipborn.”

 Art managed to get a breath despite the pressure on his lungs. Beyond Peter’s florid face he saw two beefy guys in nondescript clothes, arms folded, grinning: friends of Peter’s, obviously. The other patrons of Rick’s Place watched with interest, but no apparent inclination to rescue him. The owner looked concerned, though. “You damage anything, you’ll pay for it,” he growled.

Art flicked his eyes back to Peter. “What are you talking about?” he wheezed. “I am Shipborn. You know that. You—” He had to stop as the pressure on his chest increased.

 “You’re a boot-licking jelly-spined mouthpiece for the bloody Council and Crew, that’s what you are!” Peter bellowed. “And you aren’t welcome here!”

 “Look, Peter, why don’t we sit down—I’ll buy you a drink—”

 “I don’t drink with Council or Crew!” But Peter let go of him and stepped back. “Come on, Stoddard, we’ve put this off long enough. Let’s settle it!”

 Art took a couple of deep breaths and pressed the heel of his hand into his aching chest. “Settle what?” he said, honestly bewildered. He’d come in here, minding his own business, looking for a little relaxation after a hard day spent sweltering in the rain forest in Hab Six trying to get some decent video of dead fish, and now…

 Over Pete’s shoulder he saw Treena downing a drink he certainly hadn’t bought for her, and talking to a tall young man in tight blue coveralls. He wore the gold star of an approved reproductive partner, just like Art. Art groaned and turned his attention back to his erstwhile friend. “Pete, what’s this all about?”

 “I see you,” Pete said. “Every night. You in your nice suit. You in your fancy studio. Living up in Habitat Three. We played together as kids. I was every bit as good as you at everything. Better at most things. And you’re up there,” he pointed toward the ceiling, “and I’m down here.” He waved his hand vaguely to encompass the bar and presumably the entire habitat. “And you know what they’ve got me doing? Scrubbing hydro tanks. Robot work.” His fists clenched.

 Art flushed, and fought to keep his temper. He didn’t want a fight—not with anyone, but especially not with Peter. Peter was—had been—his best friend. As kids they’d once promised they’d be friends all their lives. “Look, Peter, you’re right, it’s not fair. I just got lucky, that’s all. It could just as easily have been the other way around.” If your father were on the Council and could pull the strings necessary to get you a job like mine, he thought, instead of a crazy drunk who managed the impossible task of getting himself killed by a maintenance robot. And speaking of crazy drunks… “Let me buy you a drink and we’ll—”

 “I don’t want a drink! You think you can buy anything, don’t you? You think you’ve got it all—fancy clothes, money—lots of money—and girls. Lots of girls. You always got a girl, Art.”

He glanced at Treena. She wasn’t paying any attention to them; she only had eyes for the tall young man, who had now folded himself into the seat Art should have already been occupying, beer in hand.

Art felt a surge of anger at the sight. This has gone on long enough. He didn’t try to keep the contempt out of his voice. “Would you like me to find you a girl, Pete? Is that what you need?”

Peter’s face darkened even more. “I don’t need anything from you, Mister Stoddard,” he said as distinctly as alcohol would let him. “Except the pleasure of smashing your pretty face in. We’ll

see how much good you are to the Council after—”  

“So go ahead! Smash my face in. And then what happens to you? It won’t be hydro tanks any more. It will be sewage tanks. Or prison.”

 “You can’t scare me!” But Peter’s eyes narrowed, and behind him, his two friends exchanged worried looks.

 “I am the Information Dissemination Specialist: Civilian,” Art said coldly. “You are a…what? Manual Laborer, Fourth Class? A ‘make-work jerk’?” It was a term of contempt, and Art made sure his voice dripped with it. “Just which do you think is of more importance to the workings of the ship, old friend?”

 “You little shit!” Peter lunged at him, but his friends grabbed his arms and held him back.

 “He’s not worth it, Pete,” one said urgently. “You heard him. You touch him and he’ll have the ’keeps on you. He’s practically Crew!”

 Art had not moved and he said nothing, but his anger drained away and his stomach churned as he looked at Peter’s rage-twisted face; then Peter shoved his companions away, straightened and turned his back contemptuously on Art. Art glanced around the room. No one would meet his eyes; even Rick turned away and busied himself with mixing drinks. The juke started cranking out the latest syrupy synthotune.

 Art went back to the long faux-oak bar, where the drinks he’d bought still waited. Peter’s right, he thought sickly. I shouldn’t come here anymore. He drank deeply of his ale, the hand holding the glass trembling slightly. It was time to find some other place to drink—someplace where he was still wanted. “Here’s looking at you, kid,” he muttered, and drained his glass. Then he tossed back the pink cocktail, made a face at its burning sweetness, and turned to leave.

 A cool touch on his hand stopped him. He looked back and down into Treena’s blue eyes. “Not going without me, I hope?” she murmured.

 He blinked, surprised. “I thought—” he looked over her shoulder. “That tall guy—”

 “Not my type,” Treena said.

 “He bought you a drink.”

 She shrugged. “I never turn down a free drink. Come on, let’s get out of here.”

 Art laughed, suddenly feeling better. “With pleasure.” The cost of the drinks had been automatically deducted from his account the moment he’d ordered them; he left the empty glasses on the bar, took Treena’s arm and started toward the door…only to find it blocked by a tall man wearing a disheveled and suspiciously stained suit, his shock of white hair glowing in the light. He’d stumbled to his feet from a booth as they approached, and now stood between them and their escape.

 “Yer a ghoul…good…good lad,” the man wheezed. “Standing up for selsh…self.”

 Art took a deep breath, then wished he hadn’t as the reek of whiskey and onions filled his nose. He swallowed to keep from gagging and said, “Councilor Woods. You shouldn’t be here. Where are your bodyguards?”

 Woods drew himself up. “Don’t need ’em. People love me. Fav’rite Councilor. Four years running. Puke a pup…I mean, look it up.” He poked a finger into Art’s chest, and then weaved away toward the bar.

Art sighed, shook his head, and led Treena outside. They emerged into a narrow roadway with four-story stacks of apartments on either side, light gleaming in hundreds of windows, rising up to the skyplate, itself dark except for the pinpricks of light intended to simulate the stars as seen from Earth. Never having seen Earth—never having set foot on any planet—Art didn’t have a clue if the effect was accurate or not. His father and the others of the Originals said it was, and he supposed they would know. Unlike them, though, he never thought of those lights as stars. They were nothing but low-energy/high-output LEDs, and unless he missed his guess, about half of the ones that should have been shining up there were burned out.

 Something skittered past them down the pale ceramic pavement, a silvery globe with four jointed spider-legs and four manipulator arms: one of the ubiquitous maintenance robots. Art had once been told that on a ship the size of the Mayflower II a part failed every three seconds. A dozen micro-factories utilizing 3D printing technology recycled old parts and churned out new ones, and a thousand robots scurried around the habitats fixing and replacing, and yet…

 And yet, the LED constellations overhead had dozens of blank spots, the fish were dying in the tropical rainforest habitat, and every day other stories of breakdowns and failures crossed Art’s desk…

 Crossed his desk, and fell into the black hole of silence imposed by the Council and Crew on any news of problems with ship maintenance.

 Art sighed. He looked up at the skyplate again and tried to imagine what it must be like to walk the surface of a planet with nothing between him and space but a few insubstantial kilometres of gases. He’d watched hundreds of ancient entertainments, “films” and TV shows and holographic soap operas, and though to him the Mayflower II had always been home and world combined, sometimes he longed for the wonders of those long-gone days, for mountains and oceans and skyscrapers and a vast blue sky of air —

 —for room; room enough to escape the constant press of — People like Peter. “Bastard,” he muttered. 

 “Was he really a friend of yours?” Treena asked. In the cool darkness she seemed much younger than she had in the overheated bar.

Art put his arm around her and she snuggled close. “He was my best friend, once. But we—drifted apart.” He started walking, away from Rick’s Place, from Peter, and from memories.

 “Because he’s a ‘make-work jerk’ and you’re—”

 “I shouldn’t have said that,” Art muttered.

 “But that’s why, isn’t it?”

 “Yeah, but I still shouldn’t have said it.”

 “Why not?”

 “I pulled rank on him.” He shook his head. “That’s a Council trick. A Crew trick.”

 “That’s all right,” Treena said brightly. “You practically are Crew.”

 He almost hit her. Instead he stopped, there on the ceramic street, until he could say, gently, “I’m not. I’m Shipborn. Like him. Like you.”

 “But—”

 “Don’t talk.” Art roughly pulled her close. “Haven’t we got better things to do than talk?”

 She nodded and smiled, back on familiar ground. “Where—”

 As if there were any choice. He could no more take her to his home in Habitat Three then he could have fixed the matter/antimatter reactor that powered the ship. “Your place,” he said, and let her lead him away into the artificial night.

 

You can buy the entire book here or here or here or wherever science fiction is sold and the e-book here or here or here.

More Samples — Defining Diana

28 Jul

Hope you enjoyed the sample of Fall From Earth yesterday.

Maybe you would like to check out the first 4 chapters of Defining Diana by Hayden Trenholm.

If it interests you, you can order print or e-books here. Or pretty much anywhere SF books are sold.

Fall From Earth

28 Jul

If you’d like to see what we do at Bundoran Press, why not check out this sample from Fall From Earth?

Like it, you can buy the book here. Prefer the eBook, go here.